Lake Wylie Rotary earns two awards

June 23, 2013 

— The Rotary Club of Lake Wylie earned two awards presented by Rotary District 7750 Gov. Kim Gramling at the installation and awards dinner June 15 in Greenwood.

Club President Chad Bordeaux was presented with the 2012-13 Presidential Citation Award, an honor less than 10 percent of Rotary clubs worldwide receive.

“By qualifying for the Presidential Citation, clubs – like the Rotary Club of Lake Wylie – contribute to Rotary’s organizational goals and multiply the impact of their good work through the collective focus of 34,000 Rotary clubs worldwide,” said Rotary International President Sakuji Tanaka.

The club also received the Bronze Club of Excellence Award.

The Rotary Club of Lake Wylie supports several projects, including literacy, scholarships and Clover School District’s backpack program. The club also helped convert Clover Area Assistance Center to a full-choice food pantry and constructed an equipment storage building for Lake Wylie Athletic Association.

Chartered in 2010, club members seek to use service as an avenue to make a difference in local community and the world.

The club unites with more than 1.2 million members worldwide to provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards and build peace and goodwill.

The Lake Wylie club welcomes guests to its weekly meetings at noon Tuesdays at the Good Samaritan United Methodist Church, 5220 Crowders Cove Lane.

For more information about becoming a Rotarian, call 704-534-7131 or visit lwrotaryclub.org.

Submitted by Bob Stigers

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